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Jubileum

Not everybody gets to turn 110 years, but our wallpaper factory does. Jubileum is a wallpaper collection of the century – a birthday gift from all of us at Boråstapeter to all of you across the world who have decorated with our classic, eternally stylish wallpapers for decades and will continue to do so for years to come.
This is a wallpaper collection that features our most popular wallpaper patterns since 1905 until today. Inspired by the national romanticism from the turn of the 19th century, the colorful optimism of the 1950s and the warm, vivid patterns that were thrown in for free in the 1980s when the French wave swept across Sweden. We invite you to browse through our greatest wallpapers of all time, gently brought out from our vast archives and updated in new, modern shades and colors that fit in with your life here and now. Wallpaper for walls by Boråstapeter

Jubileum - 5476

Flora It isn’t really that unexpected for a country like Sweden to produce wallpapers that dreams are made of. After all, it is a place on earth full of people who are constantly longing for the season when everything starts to blossom again. The 1950s witnessed an unrestrained interest in nature’s most beautiful creations among designers throughout the country. Caught in that wind’s eye when everything is balancing between one boot in the field and a polished shoe heading down future’s lane. Nobody knew what was waiting around the corner and creativity was limitless. colors and shapes were at the forefront and wallpapers with summery flowers turned into longed­for light therapy for frostbitten Northerners.Show collection Jubileum
$69.00

Jubileum - 5477

Ingrid Historically speaking, cow parsley on wallpaper has always been a symbol for a grander, posher life and that is only partly due to the poetic, pretty summer meadows in which the flower grows. Its British nickname – Queen Anne’s laces – might give away the reason why cow parsley is often seen in many quite noble situations. This particular wallpaper comes from the 1940s but the lace pattern is more reminiscent of the ornamental ’20s.Show collection Jubileum
$54.00

Jubileum - 5478

Ingrid Historically speaking, cow parsley on wallpaper has always been a symbol for a grander, posher life and that is only partly due to the poetic, pretty summer meadows in which the flower grows. Its British nickname – Queen Anne’s laces – might give away the reason why cow parsley is often seen in many quite noble situations. This particular wallpaper comes from the 1940s but the lace pattern is more reminiscent of the ornamental ’20s.Show collection Jubileum
$54.00

Jubileum - 5479

Ingrid Historically speaking, cow parsley on wallpaper has always been a symbol for a grander, posher life and that is only partly due to the poetic, pretty summer meadows in which the flower grows. Its British nickname – Queen Anne’s laces – might give away the reason why cow parsley is often seen in many quite noble situations. This particular wallpaper comes from the 1940s but the lace pattern is more reminiscent of the ornamental ’20s.Show collection Jubileum
$54.00

Jubileum - 5480

Ingrid Historically speaking, cow parsley on wallpaper has always been a symbol for a grander, posher life and that is only partly due to the poetic, pretty summer meadows in which the flower grows. Its British nickname – Queen Anne’s laces – might give away the reason why cow parsley is often seen in many quite noble situations. This particular wallpaper comes from the 1940s but the lace pattern is more reminiscent of the ornamental ’20s.Show collection Jubileum
$54.00

Jubileum - 5481

Viktoria Are you a person prone to decorating your home with candelabra, teapots and embroidered cushions? Are you drawn to the combination of old, worn chests and industrial furniture, arranged in careless disorder but with spotless elegance? If so, you’re either a hipster or a Shabby Chic enthusiast. Viktoria is the Shabby Chic dream. It brings roses into your home, classically patinated in blue, white and light green. The print is picked up from a typically ’80s collection, during a time when vintage was a trend that gained momentum as a reaction to the overpriced furniture of the middle class. Today, you’ll find Shabby Chic followers in all corners of the world and this prevailing passion for what’s used, antique and just a little uncut seems to never fade.Show collection Jubileum
$54.00

Jubileum - 5482

Viktoria Are you a person prone to decorating your home with candelabra, teapots and embroidered cushions? Are you drawn to the combination of old, worn chests and industrial furniture, arranged in careless disorder but with spotless elegance? If so, you’re either a hipster or a Shabby Chic enthusiast. Viktoria is the Shabby Chic dream. It brings roses into your home, classically patinated in blue, white and light green. The print is picked up from a typically ’80s collection, during a time when vintage was a trend that gained momentum as a reaction to the overpriced furniture of the middle class. Today, you’ll find Shabby Chic followers in all corners of the world and this prevailing passion for what’s used, antique and just a little uncut seems to never fade.Show collection Jubileum
$54.00

Jubileum - 5483

Josefina The four­leaf clover is spread across this print with a density that is almost eerie. This so­called lucky leaf thrives on being rare. It is in fact so scarce that you’ll find at least ten thousand shamrocks before even being close to stumbling upon its four­leafed sibling. The hard­to­catch plant has been featured in Christian mythology as well as Indian and Arabic mysticism. In the early 1900s when printing techniques became more accessible and wallpapers started to be produced in greater quantities, patterns with the lucky clover began finding their way all across Swedish rustic society. And here it is now, winding its way into the gaps of a classic trellis pattern.Show collection Jubileum
$54.00

Jubileum - 5484

Josefina The four­leaf clover is spread across this print with a density that is almost eerie. This so­called lucky leaf thrives on being rare. It is in fact so scarce that you’ll find at least ten thousand shamrocks before even being close to stumbling upon its four­leafed sibling. The hard­to­catch plant has been featured in Christian mythology as well as Indian and Arabic mysticism. In the early 1900s when printing techniques became more accessible and wallpapers started to be produced in greater quantities, patterns with the lucky clover began finding their way all across Swedish rustic society. And here it is now, winding its way into the gaps of a classic trellis pattern.Show collection Jubileum
$54.00

Jubileum - 5485

Josefina The four­leaf clover is spread across this print with a density that is almost eerie. This so­called lucky leaf thrives on being rare. It is in fact so scarce that you’ll find at least ten thousand shamrocks before even being close to stumbling upon its four­leafed sibling. The hard­to­catch plant has been featured in Christian mythology as well as Indian and Arabic mysticism. In the early 1900s when printing techniques became more accessible and wallpapers started to be produced in greater quantities, patterns with the lucky clover began finding their way all across Swedish rustic society. And here it is now, winding its way into the gaps of a classic trellis pattern.Show collection Jubileum
$54.00

Jubileum - 5486

Josefina The four­leaf clover is spread across this print with a density that is almost eerie. This so­called lucky leaf thrives on being rare. It is in fact so scarce that you’ll find at least ten thousand shamrocks before even being close to stumbling upon its four­leafed sibling. The hard­to­catch plant has been featured in Christian mythology as well as Indian and Arabic mysticism. In the early 1900s when printing techniques became more accessible and wallpapers started to be produced in greater quantities, patterns with the lucky clover began finding their way all across Swedish rustic society. And here it is now, winding its way into the gaps of a classic trellis pattern.Show collection Jubileum
$54.00

Jubileum - 5487

Carl This striped wallpaper got its name from Carl Larsson, one of Sweden’s most popular artists. Stripes might very well be the most Swedish pattern of them all. This design has such typically Swedish characteristics it was predestined to be exported to the American east coast. Once on foreign soil it was renamed and became synonymous with their New England style. This is the reason why today, the distinctive stripes are much more synonymous with Martha’s Vineyard than with the Swedish west coast. The truth, however, is that even though stripes were on the walls of virtually every Swedish home as early as the 18th century this pattern went through the textile factories of Indian Madras before reaching Nordic latitudes. And that’s how striped design and mattresses came together.Show collection Jubileum
$54.00

Jubileum - 5488

Carl This striped wallpaper got its name from Carl Larsson, one of Sweden’s most popular artists. Stripes might very well be the most Swedish pattern of them all. This design has such typically Swedish characteristics it was predestined to be exported to the American east coast. Once on foreign soil it was renamed and became synonymous with their New England style. This is the reason why today, the distinctive stripes are much more synonymous with Martha’s Vineyard than with the Swedish west coast. The truth, however, is that even though stripes were on the walls of virtually every Swedish home as early as the 18th century this pattern went through the textile factories of Indian Madras before reaching Nordic latitudes. And that’s how striped design and mattresses came together.Show collection Jubileum
$54.00

Jubileum - 5489

Carl This striped wallpaper got its name from Carl Larsson, one of Sweden’s most popular artists. Stripes might very well be the most Swedish pattern of them all. This design has such typically Swedish characteristics it was predestined to be exported to the American east coast. Once on foreign soil it was renamed and became synonymous with their New England style. This is the reason why today, the distinctive stripes are much more synonymous with Martha’s Vineyard than with the Swedish west coast. The truth, however, is that even though stripes were on the walls of virtually every Swedish home as early as the 18th century this pattern went through the textile factories of Indian Madras before reaching Nordic latitudes. And that’s how striped design and mattresses came together.Show collection Jubileum
$54.00

Jubileum - 5490

Lovisa takes you twice back in time. The first time round is in the early 1900s when we dreamt of “home sweet home” and wrapped our rooms in dense flowery patterns featuring heavily romantic signatures. After that, this snug Swedish wallpaper design began its humble flirt with the rococo of the 1700s. You might recall the art form that gave us those billowing bureaus with bulging bellies. Rococo gained a foothold at a time when people started to travel for pleasure and dreamt about discovering the Far East and other remote corners of the world. This is why you’ll find both playful Chinese and asymmetrical signs in this modern interpretation that still manages to instil a sense of sweet serenity in our homes more than a hundred years after its heyday.Show collection Jubileum
$54.00

Jubileum - 5491

Lovisa takes you twice back in time. The first time round is in the early 1900s when we dreamt of “home sweet home” and wrapped our rooms in dense flowery patterns featuring heavily romantic signatures. After that, this snug Swedish wallpaper design began its humble flirt with the rococo of the 1700s. You might recall the art form that gave us those billowing bureaus with bulging bellies. Rococo gained a foothold at a time when people started to travel for pleasure and dreamt about discovering the Far East and other remote corners of the world. This is why you’ll find both playful Chinese and asymmetrical signs in this modern interpretation that still manages to instil a sense of sweet serenity in our homes more than a hundred years after its heyday.Show collection Jubileum
$54.00

Jubileum - 5492

Lilja When industrialism flourished sometime during the turn of the 19th century a couple of artists decided it was time for a revolution. They wanted to prove what the hand could do and machine could not. Accordingly, they began painting patterns that went above and beyond every rule and tradition known to man during that era. And, despite the fact that their patterns were full of drawings of beautiful, winding plants revealing nothing but the tell­tale signs of true romantics, the artists were all depicted as vulgar rebels. Today, their work of art is called Jugend, or Art Nouveau in French. And, should you take a closer look you’ll find every characteristic of a true revolutionary romantic: sweeping unending lines, rhythmically repeated flowers and abstract background lines in total harmony with Jugend­style painted stems. Quite simply, nature’s harp at play.Show collection Jubileum
$54.00

Jubileum - 5493

Lilja When industrialism flourished sometime during the turn of the 19th century a couple of artists decided it was time for a revolution. They wanted to prove what the hand could do and machine could not. Accordingly, they began painting patterns that went above and beyond every rule and tradition known to man during that era. And, despite the fact that their patterns were full of drawings of beautiful, winding plants revealing nothing but the tell­tale signs of true romantics, the artists were all depicted as vulgar rebels. Today, their work of art is called Jugend, or Art Nouveau in French. And, should you take a closer look you’ll find every characteristic of a true revolutionary romantic: sweeping unending lines, rhythmically repeated flowers and abstract background lines in total harmony with Jugend­style painted stems. Quite simply, nature’s harp at play.Show collection Jubileum
$54.00

Jubileum - 5494

Lilja When industrialism flourished sometime during the turn of the 19th century a couple of artists decided it was time for a revolution. They wanted to prove what the hand could do and machine could not. Accordingly, they began painting patterns that went above and beyond every rule and tradition known to man during that era. And, despite the fact that their patterns were full of drawings of beautiful, winding plants revealing nothing but the tell­tale signs of true romantics, the artists were all depicted as vulgar rebels. Today, their work of art is called Jugend, or Art Nouveau in French. And, should you take a closer look you’ll find every characteristic of a true revolutionary romantic: sweeping unending lines, rhythmically repeated flowers and abstract background lines in total harmony with Jugend­style painted stems. Quite simply, nature’s harp at play.Show collection Jubileum
$54.00
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